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Bringing home a puppy or kitten is an exciting experience for everyone in the family! This new adventure comes with many responsibilities. Here are a few tips to keep in mind to help your new pet stays happy and healthy in her new home. 

 

Don’t wait; vaccinate

August is National Immunization Awareness Month, and it doesn’t only apply to humans. Your new puppy or kitten will require a series of vaccines to get her started on the right foot and prevent potentially deadly diseases. The day you bring your new pet home, call our office to schedule an appointment. And, bring her in just to say hi and get a treat from time to time! This will help her develop a positive feeling about visiting the vet. 

 

Spay/neuter

According to the ASPCA, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized each year. And, spaying/neutering is much more than a way to combat the pet overpopulation problem; it’s also a safe and effective way to prevent many pet health and behavior issues. 

 

Prevent preventable diseases

During your puppy or kitten’s first year, we’ll recommend that you start her on the appropriate preventive medications, like heartworm and flea/tick preventives.

 

Microchip

As simple as getting a vaccine, a microchip will greatly increase your pet’s chances of coming home safely if she’s ever lost. 

 

Make healthy introductions

Introducing a new puppy or kitten to an existing pet can be tough, especially if the existing pet is accustomed to having the house and your affection all to herself. Before making introductions, take away any items your pet might feel protective of, like food dishes and favorite toys. Dogs should be introduced on neutral territory, such as a park. 

 

A new kitten can be placed in a room that your existing pet doesn’t go into often. Place a large pen or dog kennel in the room and put the new kitten’s food in the kennel. When the kitten is eating in the kennel, close the kennel door, but open the bedroom door. This will give your existing pet an opportunity to go into the room and check out the new kitten’s scent without either of the animals being too overwhelmed.

 

Train and socialize

Set your new pet up for success by properly training and socializing her from a young age. Pets are supposed to enhance our lives, and taking the necessary time for training early on will help you enjoy each other’s company for years to come.

 

Get your new puppy or kitten in for their first wellness exam! We can help answer any questions you have! Contact us to schedule an appointment.